Rafe Hart

Thoughts on security, privacy, and building software.

Installing Cygwin

25 May 2015

As one might expect, taking a voluntary redundancy, job hunting, and getting up to speed in a new role leaves very little time for blogging. Now that I’m able to do so again, I’ve decided that instead of focusing on new programs for a while, I’m going to go through and update previous guides. Cygwin is a moving target, and there have been changes to how windows and cygwin usernames are mapped to each other, and other updates. So first off, installing cygwin…

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libusb on Cygwin

01 March 2015

When you next upgrade, if you have installed a package that depends on libusb, you will get a prompt to download and install libusb-win32. The popup contains the download link, but if you don’t want to retype it, libusb-win32 is available here.

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DNS Enumeration on Cygwin

19 February 2015

As part of pentesting your site, or that of a client, you will need to find all as much detail out about a domain and it’s IP ranges as possible, or at least demonstrate what can be found via automated tools. Typically this is done through dig, or a bruteforcing tool like dnsenum or fierce.pl. Dig is installed with the bind-utils cygwin package, and it straightforward to use (type ‘dig any domainname.com’, or look at man dig to get started).

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ShellCheck

15 February 2015

This is a quick note to share a useful tool by Vidar ‘koala_man’ Holen, www.shellcheck.net. ShellCheck is a site that allows you to paste in your bash scripts and receive automated feed back on common errors and security holes.

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Experiment finished?

15 February 2015

After 10 months of running the http://cygwin.rafaelhart.com sub-domain, I’m now getting about 500 hits a month on what is largely an SEO-un-optimized site, and with the other professional sites I’ve worked on, I’ve largely come to the conclusion that there are only two rules that matter for driving traffic to sites.

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dtrx on Cygwin

22 January 2015

These days, most files that are compressed come in 7zip, zip or tar/gunzip format, though there are a myriad of other types out there. I first cut my teeth on arj, but those were the days of DOOM, Slackware 3.0 and floppy disks. When you do come across an unfamiliar format, it can slow down your workflow to look for the right switches, which is where dtrx - “Do the Right Extraction” comes in. It will extract bz2, cab, cpio, deb, gem, gz, lzh, lzma, rar, rpm, xz, 7z and a variety of other niche compressions. It depends on Python, and you can install it with:

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